Dr. Anthony Fauci has said he doesn’t think “we’re going to be completely normal a year from now.”

The US health chief was speaking to students from the University of Edinburgh when he claimed a return to normality will not be seen for at least another twelve months.

“I don’t think we’re going to be completely normal a year from now,” Dr. Fauci said.

“But I hope we’re well on the way to normality so that we can ultimately get the world protected at the same time as we get economic recovery so that all the unintended consequences of shutting down begin to normalize, including other health issues that have arisen because of the shutdown.”

The comments come after he last week confirmed young children could be vaccinated by early 2022 and teenagers in the US may have access to the vaccine by September.

“If you project realistically when we’ll be able to get enough data to be able to say that elementary school children will be able to be vaccinated, I would think that would be, at the earliest, the end of the year, and very likely the first quarter of 2022,” Fauci told NBC.

“But for the high school kids, it looks like some time this fall. I’m not sure it’s exactly on the first day that school opens, but pretty close to that,” he said.

Moderna announced in January that it would be testing its vaccine in young children soon, but couldn’t confirm when it would be available.

Fauci also stated that the public may have to wear masks into next year.

“You know because it depends on the level of dynamics of the virus that’s in the community,” he explained to CNN when asked about dispensing with mask requirements.

“If you see the level coming down really, really very low, I want it to keep going down to a baseline that’s so low, that there’s virtually no threat — or not no. It’ll never be zero, but a minimal, minimal threat that you will be exposed to someone who is infected.”