Amnesty Ireland, the National Women’s Council of Ireland, and a host of other Irish NGOs have signed an open letter calling on politicians to “no longer provide legitimate representation” to those with critical views on transgenderism and gender ideology, which the letter equals with “bigoted beliefs that are aligned with far right ideologies.” It is unclear if these organisations believe that politicians should begin simply totally ignoring gender critical constituents or if they are of the view that, in this particular instance, universal suffrage may have been somewhat of a mistake.

Many leading feminists, including author JK Rowling, have recently come under persistent attack from NGOs because they believe that gender is not separate from sex, and that women are distinct human beings whose rights are being diminshed and endangered by the assertion that gender is fluid and legally changeable without any medical treatment.

Amongst the opinions that Amnesty Ireland and the National Women’s Council of Ireland think should lead to people being stripped of political representation is opposition to “affirmative medical care of transgender people” and “the right to self-identification.”

Affirmative medical care refers to the idea that doctors should act to affirm or “validate” the gender identity of those who come to them expressing the belief they may be transgender. This would mean that a doctor who encounters a young child who claims to be transgender should act to support the changing of that child’s gender by any means possible up to, and including, potentially irreversible hormonal or surgical interventions. This, activists say, will lead to a better outcome than having the doctor push back against the child’s belief or taking a “wait and see” approach to see if the child’s belief that they are transgender simply dissipates.

Self-identification, which is currently the law in Ireland, simply means that all that is required to legally change one’s gender is to tick a box that says you want to live as a particular gender and that you don’t have to have consulted with psychologists or other medical professionals before changing your gender.

The letter says that that there has been an increase in “discriminatory organisations and vocal transgender exclusionary activists” have been “using Twitter and divisive antics” to “defend biology” and “fight gender identity and expression.”

It says that these organisations are “not organisations at all” but rather “simply Twitter accounts.” The letter says that those refusing to advocate for gender affirmative treatments are “not radical, they are not inclusive, and they are not feminists.”

The letter seems to have prompted by the recent publication of an article in the Irish Independent by the LGB Alliance Ireland, although the Alliance is not mentioned by name in the letter itself. Gay Community News has previously called the Alliance a “hate group” but the Alliance describes itself as an organisation of “lesbians, bisexuals and gay men” who believe that “sexual orientation is different to gender identity” and that “the needs of lesbian, gay and bisexual people are different to the needs of transgender people.”

The letter, by calling on citizens to be stripped of political representation for their opinions, would seem to clash with the provisions of several major international treaties on human rights, most notably the Universal Declaration on Human Rights, the International Covenant on Civil and Political Rights, and, as the gender critical movement itself appears to be largely a women’s movement, arguably the Convention on the Elimination of all Forms of Discrimination against Women.

Interestingly many of the NGOs that have signed the letter receive funding from the Irish government, effectively meaning that the Irish Government is now funding a movement calling on political representation to be removed from Irish citizens.

The LGB Alliance Ireland have said that they will responding to the letter in full in the coming days, but that they had found the letter “revealing, bemusing and offensive, all at once.” They said that “amidst the lies, smears and terrible wording” there were some things in the letter that they agreed with, such as the argument that transgender people should have access to “appropriate medical care” and that transgender people should be “included in our society, respected and treated with dignity.”

Amnesty Ireland’s CEO Colm Gorman remarked on Twitter that he was “proud” that Amnesty Ireland had signed the letter.