The world-famous psychologist told his female listeners to “bring a child into the world” anyway, despite the claims of some that having children detrimentally impacts on the environment.

Recounting his exchange with one woman who was told by her friends that “only an evil and cruel person would bring a child into a world this terrible, and worse, the damage to the planet that that child will inevitably do”, Peterson said, “I think that the great adventure for women — at least in part, this is the maternal adventure — is to bring a child into the world…”

Numerous climate change alarmists have said children represent “carbon legacies” and have urged women to consider having no children at all, in order to supposedly “save the planet.”

Read the extract of his recent conversation with Bishop Robert Barron:

Peterson: There’s a serious conversation to be had with young women. A woman asked me a question on my Q&A this month. She said that her friends are really down on her. She claims to not be a feminist, but even more importantly, because she wants to have children. And they’re telling her that only an evil and cruel person would bring a child into a world this terrible, and worse, [they tell her about] the damage to the planet that that child will inevitably do. And people are very serious about this. And they are very hard on young women.

I always think of the Pieta [sculpture by Michelangelo depicting the Virgin Mary cradling the body of her son Jesus, who was just taken down from the cross], because I kind of think of it as the Christian equivalent of the crucifix — you know, you have Mary there with her broken son in her arms. And I think that the great adventure for women — at least in part, this is the maternal adventure — is to bring a child into the world, knowing full well the consequence is a crucifixion-like brokenness. And that it’s still a mark of faith in the possibilities of being [existence], to participate in that and not to hide from it and to say: ‘Well, despite everything, I’m going to act out my faith in life and in the possibilities of being [existence] and I’m going to bring someone into the world who will be a net force for good rather than evil. And that’s my moral obligation.’

I think to present that to young women as a major part of the adventure of their life, which is certainly the truth, is something that is attractive to far more of them than would be likely to admit it in today’s time and age.