C: Twitter (via Dr Matthew M. Wielicki) & Wikimedia Commons (L)

Prof leaves University post due to “silence on the false ‘climate emergency’ narrative”.

An assistant professor in the Department of Geological Sciences at the University of Alabama says that he is leaving his position partly because of the false “climate emergency” narrative, and the “rise of illiberalism” on campuses.

Dr Matthew M. Wielicki shared his reasons for leaving the faculty position in the Department of Geological Sciences on Twitter this week.

While personal family matters featured in the decision, it was his reflections on how “illiberal” universities have become that caught the attention of social media users and caused his post to go viral.

Universities, he said, are “no longer places that embrace the freedom of exchanging ideas and will punish those that go against the narrative.”

The scientist also said that the earth sciences communities were afraid to speak out against what he called a false “climate emergency narrative.”

“Contributing to this is the earth science communities silence on what he described as a “false climate emergency narrative”.

“Members of the community routinely discuss the mental health effects of climate catastrophism but dare not speak out,” he wrote.

 

“Some internet sleuths have discovered that I will be leaving my faculty position in the Department of Geological Sciences after this semester so I thought I should tell you why. As with most large decisions, the reasons are mainly personal.

“COVID made me realize that we were really far from our families in CA and the travel on our elderly parents was taking a toll. The result was that our children were not seeing their grandparents very often. As a Polish immigrant I know what it’s like to live far from family and I started to resent myself for choosing my career over my family’s time together,” Dr Wielicki wrote.

“Furthermore, over the last decade or so, but especially the last few years, the obsession with universities and grant-funding institutions on immutable characteristics of faculty and students and the push for equity in science above all else has dramatically changed the profession of an academic professor,” he continued.

“The rise of illiberalism in the name of DEI is the antithesis of the principles that universities were founded on. These are no longer places that embrace the freedom of exchanging ideas and will punish those that go against the narrative.”

“Although I had worked from an early age to earn a Ph.D. and become a professor, like my father, I feel the profession is no longer worthy of my efforts.”

“Contributing to this is the earth science communities silence on the false “climate emergency” narrative. Members of the community routinely discuss the mental health effects of climate catastrophism but dare not speak out lest they lose their positions and research funds,” he wrote.

Dr Wielicki previously said that he became concerned about the impact of catastrophic climate change alarmism while asking his students about their future plans.

“It was very eye opening that the vast majority of my students, particularly female students, were no longer even considering raising a family. And I can see how demoralized they were. And that’s really what kind of opened my eyes to the fact that we have a real mental health crisis on our hands,” Wielicki said.

He has since been critical of the “never-ending drumbeat of catastrophism.”

He said that the fear being produced by climate alarmism drives a sense of futility, so that young people students lack ambition to do anything to produce a better future.

“If you’re really concerned about the environment, this is the exact wrong way to go about it,” Dr Wielicki said.

The scientist also pointed to financial interests behind much of what he believes to be climate alarmism, saying that if research concludes that there’s a crisis, then it gets more attention — and more funding.

In this regard he said that the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change was more of a government body seeking behavioural change than a scientific body.

“If there is no climate catastrophe in the future, is there really a need for the IPCC?” Wielicki said.

Wielicki pointed to an erosion in the public’s trust in science and says he’s concerned that what he describes as “the misrepresentation of climate science” will make that worse.

“If we lose the public’s trust in science, then basically my career is worthless. Because if I don’t have the trust of the people that I’m talking to, they’re not going to believe anything,” Wielicki said.

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