The proliferation of the LGBT ideology across society seems to have been a roaring success for its proponents, making its way into almost every possible cultural crevice, from media to politics, from schools to courts, with the astounding power now wielded by this lobby in no doubt.

Turning the debate into one about “rights” and “victimisation”, LGBT campaigners were able to convince a critical mass of people to give them everything they ever dreamed of and more, simultaneously brow-beating into near-silence those who still hold to a more traditional view on what is normal when it comes to sexuality and gender.

Having won widespread approval for LGB behaviours, the latest crusade is all about transgenderism (T), normalising gender dysphoria by having us all share bathrooms and pretend boys can have periods. But these monumental demands to dispense with all biological reality seem to be a step too far for some people within the woke-sphere; a fracture has now emerged in LGBT circles, blindsiding activists in countries around the world, including our own Ireland.

The LGB Alliance Ireland was set up recently to stand apart from the transgender ideology that has been successfully tacked on to the alphabet soup of leftwing identity politics. The most notable critic of transgender ideology is of course JK Rowling, with many feminists joining her in expressing doubts about the wisdom of entertaining males who claim they are female.

For the unschooled in these matters, those favourable to groups like the LGB Alliance are pejoratively called TERFs (Trans-Exclusionary Radical Feminists) by the majority of LGBT activists who can’t abide them questioning this sudden, sacred cow of gender transition.

Irish TERFs are now experiencing some of the bile previously thrown at those who opposed the LGBT lobby from the outset, with robust exchanges taking place online and in print between former comrades who have brought Ireland Inc to never-before-seen frontiers.

Who would have thought the Irish Independent, one of the oldest papers in the country, would be reduced to discussing whether babies can be “trans” in the  (their quote) “LGBTQIAAPK2S+ movement”?

The Burkean’s Ciaran Brennan has done a commendable job at detailing the unfolding drama between the two camps, claiming Ireland is merely “playing catch up” as the wheels come off the transgender movement elsewhere.

The seeds of self-destruction for the entire ideology might only be barely visible now, but they were surely sown long ago.

One gets the feeling however that the quasi-religious fervour of “all-in” LGBT activists will be with us for some time, despite the emperor marching on without clothes.